Wednesday, 11 January 2017

2016-What's changed for Cancer?

I love reading peoples yearly reviews and everyone I have read so far has had such a fun and eventful time. It seems like a great idea for me to do too because I also had a year to remember-I went to NYC for goodness sake! But I thought I would be different. A lot has changed this past year in terms of Cancer Research so I thought I would write about this instead. How has cancer policy and research changed in 2016? After all cancer affects us all in one way or another. 

Many things have changed in terms of policy or research goals. Here are some highlights

1. Brexit

Yes it is the elephant in the room so thought I better address this one first. What kind of Brexit? Hard? Soft? Red white and blue? Whatever that means! The UK voted to leave the EU and of course this will effect funding for all medical areas including cancer.

2. Money for Radiotherapy

A huge £130 million was announced for investment into radiotherapy, a very common treatment for most cancers.

3. Cancer waiting failed to reach target

Cancer patients are still having to wait for too long to get vital treatments, scans and procedures. Catching and treating cancer sooner goes a long way towards a patient’s survival rate. I do hope for 2017 these waiting times decrease.

4. Increase in research funding

The government announced that they are becoming more committed to spending more money to fund cancer research proposals. The target is to increase by £2 BILLION a year by 2020. This money will go such a long way to fund vital research for cancer treatments and cures.

5. Cancer strategy changes

Throughout Scotland, England and Wales new cancer strategies and plans have been put in place to combat cancer. This hopes to improve research, treatments and patient care. The strategies have been said to be ambitious but needed.

6. New screening tests for bowel and cervical cancer

Prevention of cancer is the most effective treatment. New and more effective screening tests for cancers effecting the bowel or the cervix were announced in 2016. With these new tests comes the potential to save more lives.

7. Plans to tackle childhood obesity

A lot of childhood cancers can be prevented by following a more healthy diet and lifestyle. This is true for other types of disease and of course for adults too. The government has announced plans to try and reduce the ever increasing levels of childhood obesity in Britain. One part of this is of course the sugar tax.

To read more about cancer research, awareness and whether or not more qualified individuals believe that some of these plans will work, read the CRUK science blog. Together we can beat cancer sooner.

Have you been affected by cancer? Ever fundraised for cancer research?

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16 comments

  1. My best friend has recently had the all clear from breast cancer at 34 and my cousin is currently in christies being treated (but not successfully) for Overian cancer at 38.

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    1. It's such a horrid thing, mummy thoughts are with your cousin x

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  2. The real concern about Brexit is the licensing of medication and the control over drug pricing. But lots of positives in the list too

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    1. There are so many worries and uncertainties with Brexit. It would get very long and boring to mention them all ha

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  3. I do hope the sugar tax is brought in. I cannot believe how dangerous a substance for us.

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    1. I know! I'm going sugar free for all of February to raise funds for cancer research. It'll be a struggle but the health benefits will get me through I think

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  4. I've fundraised for cancer charities, so it is a cause close to my heart. What a unique and informative post! Thank you for sharing :) it seems to be slow improvements, but hopefully 2017 will mean more improvements and developments x

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    1. My gran is a very recent cancer survivor so it's very close to my heart too. Fundraising, awareness and research helps so much

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  5. so scared about Brexit, I used to work at a world leading uni who focus on cancer research and I know how much research will be hit by this. We also won't be able to attract all the best scientists.

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    1. I work in a uni now and it was like there was a cloud hanging over everyone the day after the result was announced

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  6. I really hope that Brexit does not have a negative impact on Cancer, the EU protected us from so many legislation rules and now what?

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    1. There is no know what is going to happen which is terrifying

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  7. This is a great post. A lot of positive points, though negative too. Cancer is the most awful disease in the world. :(

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    1. Research has come such a long way but there is still much more to be done

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  8. Very informative. I think everyone has been blighted by cancer in some way, it is a terrible disease and one that needs so much more money and research thrown at it.

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  9. I hope the our governmeent will be able to cover the loss of funding due to Brexit. It's a shame we could losing funding because of it.

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